Moc Bai

Moc Bai is not in my best 100 place in the world but…

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Moc Bai is not in my best 100 place in the world.

But…

For foreigners in Vietnam who need to do a quick exit out of the country and get their passports stamp, Moc Bai Border in Tay Ninh province is just the right place. It’s 70 kilometers away from the city and it takes about two to three hours travel time depending on where you ride the bus.

If you live in District 1, go to the bus terminal in Pham Ngu Lao and find bus 703. This is the only bus with a direct route to Moc Bai. Outsiders, like me, who don’t live in the expat area can still catch the bus without going to Pham Ngu Lao. If you live in  D5, D10 and Phu Nhuan, it’s better that you proceed to Ly Thuong Kiet and find the nearest bus stop along that stretch. Make sure you’re on the right side so that it would go to Moc Bai and not back to the terminal.

If, however, you live in Go Vap and somewhere in the countryside like D12, I suggest you go to Truong Chinh, where bus 703 passes through just after it drove past Cong Hoa.

Cong Hoa is one of the main roads in Tan Binh District. Expats who live there can opt to find a bus stop along that stretch. I haven’t seen lots of bus stop though and it could be quite intimidating to cross the road.

Travellers to Moc Bai must catch the earliest bus trip which is at 6:00 a.m. You won’t like the place much when the sun is shining so brightly and the surrounding is dry, humid. Bring jugs of water, put on sunscreen and muster lots of patience!
The last trip from Moc Bai to HCM is at 7:15 p.m.

The total expense for this trip is only 180 vnd. That includes round trip bus fare and the fee for entering and exiting Cambodia.
If you’re lucky, you’ll have to pay no more.

Expect restaurants and food stalls to be out of scene here. There are two duty free shops here though if you want to buy some snacks.

Pray, your trip is not as sad and exhausting as mine. When you feel like it is…just count your blessings!

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Welcome!

Velkommen! Bienvenido! Chào mừng! Willkommen! Mabuhay!

Welcome to my blog! I’m a newbie blogger. I wish to travel the corners of the world, see God’s  magical works and share it with you…through my eyes. I reblog posts that caught my heart and I fancy writing stories for the weekly writing task. I also write my wonderful travels and some of my travails sans the tears.

 

{Reblogged} Old & Wise

I share the same feelings. I have a soft spot for the elderly, I just can’t explain why. Looking at old, white-haired men or women, walking alone or with someone, peacefully sipping a cup of coffee or just simply sitting on a bench with his (white-haired) significant other is just amazing.

Amsterdamming

Whenever I look at the photos I`ve been taking throughout the years in various places, I notice some recurrent themes. Although I don`t particularly intend to photograph one subject or another, there are definitely some things that get my attention more than others.

One of these recurrent themes is old people. My heart always melt whenever I see an old man or woman having a nostalgic aura, a certain note of kindness in their eyes and a smile on their faces which to me translates into the appreciation of the time which has been generous to them.

Prague:
Prague

Barcelona:
Barcelona, Spain

Bucharest:
Romania

Città della Pieve (Italy):
Italy, Man at Café in Città della Pieve

Lisbon:
Lisbon, Women Chat on a Street in Alfama

Orvieto (Umbria, Italy):
Italy, Man Reading in Orvieto

Paris:
Paris, Autumn in the City

Rome:
Rome, Woman on the Street in Testaccio

Prague:
Prague

Lisbon:
Lisbon, Man on a Bench in Praça da Figueira

Rome:
Rome, Man at Window in Testaccio

Citta della Pieve (Umbria, Italy):
Italy, Città della Pieve - Reading in the Shadow

Lisbon:
Lisbon, Man and Pigeons in Alfama

Amsterdam:
Amsterdam in Summertime (2012-2013)

Montegabbione (Umbria, Italy):
Italy, Man in Montegabbione

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The Feast of Unleavened Bread

Today, Nisan 1, 5774

I was listening to the Seer attentively. Crouched down, with my old pen and steno notebook on my lap, I am writing down the major points of what he have said about an eventful day in history—when suddenly, everything started to become alive and moving and very fascinating.

Midnight (5774 years ago)

I was flabbergasted upon seeing the whole, clamorous community dressed in various antiquated robes of different shades of blue, gray and red. The elders and the women all have their hands full with either children or articles of important value. All of them seem to be in a hurry that I got myself hit and sandwiched several times. There were a lot of shouting in Hebrew I cannot understand. I passed over a homestead and saw flocks, herds and a few cattle being taken away, gathering up for a long journey ahead. I continued gallivanting around the midst of a bustling crowd, stopping over to anything that caught my fancy. I saw big and old camps set against rolling hills afar. I’ve spotted a giant deep well made of chunks of big red bricks in the middle of a farm with various crops abound—melons, leeks, cucumbers, onions and garlic. This is the thriving land of Ramses, where a hard-hearted Pharaoh ruled and where my time travel has taken me far, far back into a history I hardly ever knew until now.

It was starting to get really dark and the crowd was getting larger. Beads of sweat broke out on my forehead and my legs were sore from walking. Then I saw an open window of a large room, well-lighted by an antique lamp made of brass. Inside was a woman in her outworn, long robe hastily picking up her unleavened dough and hurriedly carried it onto her shoulders in kneading troughs wrapped in white clothing and abandoned her house swiftly. All other people I have encountered apparently have brought with them breads without yeast covered in various clothing. Immediately after that, I remembered, this is what the event was all about—it’s the feast of unleavened bread!

I followed her discreetly (though, I don’t suppose she will see me in anyway) until a large group of men with gray beards, wide shoulders, strong Hebrew accent, passed by me and I lost sight of her. I thought of Moses…could he be somewhere in this crowd? Everyone with gray beards, sharp jawline and with a stick looks like Moses to me. I wouldn’t have a way to find out by the looks, do I? So, I dig deeper into the crowd and followed my instincts.

For a moment, I found myself lost and dizzy. I slid into a quiet area to regain my strength. I thought, is this a slaughterhouse of animals for offering for I can smell the raw acrid air of blood? I’m sure I don’t like the odor but I need to catch my breath so I inhaled and exhaled, not minding the smell and absorbing what great details I have seen so far, while I’m stretching out my legs, one at a time, above the ground. Then, from afar, I saw a man with a remarkable look in brown garment, strong in disposition, seemingly old — I can’t tell his age for his beard is not that long. That remarkable man whose hands were occupied from demanding gold coins or any articles of silver and gold and clothing from the Egyptians seem to play an important role in the community. He must be Aaron or Moses or any of the elders from the 12 tribes of Jacob. At this point, and unlike any other days of the 400 long years that passed, the Egyptians fear for their lives with the Israelites on their land. They fear for another plague that is about to happen, if the children of God stayed a little longer. So they gave whatever they are asked of them by the Israelites and they urged the people of God to hurry and leave the country.

A feeling of excitement rose upon me. This night is the mark of their freedom. The humid and seemingly chaotic night turned into a beautiful stirring spectacle. I noticed that the larger part of the crowd is moving all at once in one direction. I forgot I was tired. I went out and hurried with them, making sure I wouldn’t be left out.

The Israelites, the women and their children, together with a mixed multitude who feared God, and the flocks, herds and cattle are off to the land of Succoth. This is the night of the Lord to be observed of all the children of Israel in their generations for bringing them out from the land of Egypt. This is the beginning of their time; the first day of the month of their year and for seven consecutive days they will eat pure bread, strictly the ones without yeasts.

Today, Nisan 1, 5774

I was pulled back to the present time with new hope. The Christians today are celebrating their New Year—it’s the 5774th year after the early Christians journeyed out of the land of Egypt. I was glad I have witnessed their history, or shall I say our history,  through the eyes of the Seer.